University Market

Wed 27 April, 9:00am - 4:00pm

Venue: Outside Hazelrigg, Loughborough University

FREE

OFFICIAL OPENING: WED. 27 APRIL, 9.30AM

Loughborough Markets will host a special University Market on campus on Wednesday 27 April, inviting a group of independent traders to sell at the University. This event is part of Something & Son’s Market Town commission Market Lectures, where the University and the market are trading places. The University Market will be followed by two days of Market Lectures in Loughborough’s Market Square. 

On Wednesday 27 April at 9.30 the University Market will be officially opened by Loughborough University's Vice Chancellor Robert Allison and Loughborough's Mayor John Capleton. Please join us for some refreshments at 9.30am and have a browse through the market, including traders with fruit, vegetables, eggs, cheese, organic meats, luxury home baking, handmade jewellery, reclaimed wooden items, leather goods and cosmetics. 

Something & Son have been playfully exploring the relationship between the two things that Loughborough is most famous for: the day-to-day activity of its markets and its University. These two elements from the town are usually quite separate and the design collective has created a unique installation which brings them together. A symbolic structure will be constructed which functions as both a market stall and a small lecture theatre and will form the centrepiece of both market and lectures. This structure will be produced by a local welder and can be used as a place for the trade of goods as well as knowledge. 

assunta.png

November 2018

'Co-working with Things': Exhibition Preview

November 2018

'Co-working with Things': Exhibition Preview

Join us for the opening of Assunta Ruocco's 'Co-Working with Things' in the Martin Hall Exhibition Space on Wednesday 14th November, from 4-6pm. Wine and refreshments provided, and the artist and curator will be present to discuss the work.

Click to read more

Join us for the opening of Assunta Ruocco's 'Co-Working with Things' in the Martin Hall Exhibition Space on Wednesday 14th November, from 4-6pm. Wine and refreshments provided, and the artist and curator will be present to discuss the work.

An exhibition of artistic research conducted as part of the practice-based PhD project ‘Co-working with Things. How Furnished Spaces Contribute to the Emergence of Artworks’, supervised by Gillian Whiteley and­­­­ Eleanor Morgan, within Loughborough University School of the Arts, English and Drama. All prints were produced within SAED Printmaking Workshop with the help and advice of printmaking tutor Pete Dobson. Exhibition curated by David Bell, with support from Radar­.  

Background:

In 1947, artist Anni Albers urged us to consider ‘materials as our co-workers’. In so doing she invited us to develop new relationships with machines, tools, materials and working spaces. This exhibition explores how the things with which artists work can be seen as co-workers. All the artworks presented are based on simple sets of rules derived from what was possible within a particular, contingent context: working at home or in the printmaking workshop. The works are ongoing, and insist on labour intensive relationships with materials, tools and machines arranged within particular furnished spaces.


The most important aspect common to the works is that they are not autonomous pieces produced by an autonomous artist: their dependence on situations, contexts, equipment, and the willingness of others to do some of the work is written within the ‘code’ that structures their ongoing development. The modular installation Vertical Studio is formless, until someone helps to make it by arranging the elements. Aquatint Etchings is a series of double-sided, multi-layered prints: exhibiting them always involves outsourcing the process of deciding which print is visible, and which is concealed. To make the Photo-Etchings, I asked friends to select from thousands of drawings. Those chosen were then turned into a multiple through the complex photo-etching process which produces uncontrollable variations.

The myth of artistic autonomy is challenged by artworks that depend on contingent contexts and can only emerge from specific arrangements of things. Focusing on the role of things within furnished spaces also reveals the importance of maintenance activities that are not usually seen as part of artistic labour. It is the work of setting up and looking after spaces such as homes, studios and workshops that makes the emergence of new artworks possible.

Search

Loughborough University Arts

Martin Hall Building

Loughborough University

Loughborough LE11 3TU, UK

luarts@lboro.ac.uk

01509 222 948

Join our Mailing List

Facebook

Twitter